The Discography

theundergroundismassive:

Rihanna, “Don’t Stop the Music” (Def Jam, 2007).

theundergroundismassive:

Rihanna, “S.O.S.” (Def Jam, 2006).

Looking at art in the presence of its owners or creators is part of my job. I make it harder for myself by expecting something magical and trying to be candid without being cruel. To avoid crushing hopes, I withhold disapprobation. I say, “This is autobiographical, right?” Or, “Hey, this is really something.” Or, as Gary Indiana once concluded in a review of Sherrie Levine’s work: “If you’ve never seen plywood, you’re in for a treat.”
Dave Hickey, Pirates and Farmers: Essays on Taste (Ridinghouse, 2013), p. 61-62.

Merry Clayton, “Oh No, Not My Baby” (Ode, 1972).

Charlie Haden feat. Keith Jarrett, “Ellen David” (Horizon, 1976).

Ornette Coleman Quartet, “Peace Warriors (Live in Hamburg)” (Ais, 1987/2001).

Ornette Coleman, “Lonely Woman” (Atlantic, 1959).

R.I.P. Charlie Haden.

Old and New Dreams, “Lonely Woman” (ECM, 1979).

R.I.P. Charlie Haden.

nycnostalgia:

Protesting something in the 1980s. Broadway and 111th St.

nycnostalgia:

Protesting something in the 1980s. Broadway and 111th St.


In Search of Digital Love



A 63-minute aural exploration of Daft Punk’s 2001 masterpiece, “Digital Love.” What started out as a simple idea for a podcast with a few interviews and a few music clips evolved into a pseudo-documentary, before finally taking shape as a sort of critical mashup. Give it a listen (though be forewarned: some of the mp3-derived sound quality is negligible-bordering-on-terrible… some of the messiness is deliberate too, of course). (Available as an MP3.) Big thanks to the following participants — these brave souls who followed my wacky (mostly indescribable, even to myself) hunch and made this entire operation feasible. (Not to mention a heck of a lot of fun to compile.)

I’m one of the interviewees, along with Nate Patrin and Brian MacDonald. From 2010.03.11.

In Search of Digital Love

A 63-minute aural exploration of Daft Punk’s 2001 masterpiece, “Digital Love.” What started out as a simple idea for a podcast with a few interviews and a few music clips evolved into a pseudo-documentary, before finally taking shape as a sort of critical mashup. Give it a listen (though be forewarned: some of the mp3-derived sound quality is negligible-bordering-on-terrible… some of the messiness is deliberate too, of course). (Available as an MP3.) 

Big thanks to the following participants — these brave souls who followed my wacky (mostly indescribable, even to myself) hunch and made this entire operation feasible. (Not to mention a heck of a lot of fun to compile.)

I’m one of the interviewees, along with Nate Patrin and Brian MacDonald. From 2010.03.11.