The Discography

Jul 10

nedraggett:

johndarnielle:

by request, attempting to document The Hair before I let somebody at it with scissors tomorrow. This is so totally the most death metal picture of me ever taken I don’t even know, feel like I need to get busy with a BC Rich and a couple of stomp boxes right NOW

This is the correct approach.

Literally took a second to figure out that wasn’t actually Ned.

nedraggett:

johndarnielle:

by request, attempting to document The Hair before I let somebody at it with scissors tomorrow. This is so totally the most death metal picture of me ever taken I don’t even know, feel like I need to get busy with a BC Rich and a couple of stomp boxes right NOW

This is the correct approach.

Literally took a second to figure out that wasn’t actually Ned.

(Source: trashcanland, via pixelives)

rudygodinez:

J.M. Schaeberle, Total Solar Eclipse, (1893)

rudygodinez:

J.M. Schaeberle, Total Solar Eclipse, (1893)

(via les-sources-du-nil)

Jul 09

[video]

Jul 08

But because world-beat is a specialty item that attracts enthusiasts rather than profiteers, the taste, philosophy, and vision of the entrepreneur who oversees the selection are usually what tells. Is he promoting music he has a piece of, or introducing the world to songs he loves no matter who owns them? How much talent does he have for consistency, pace, flow? Would he know a good beat if it bit him in the ass? And most important, does he believe in cultural purity, commercial crossover, or some smarter, more complex aesthetic? Overestimate people’s ability to transcend their musical assumptions and your records will bore everybody this side of a ethnomusicology convention. But underestimate your audience like the rest of the culture biz and your music will magically fuse the lamest of both worlds.

Planet Africa, from South African producer Hilton Rosenthal’s Rhythm Safari imprint, does just that. It leans heavily on laboriously Euro-friendly material from world-beat celebs like Salif Keita and Johnny Clegg, who whatever their individual gifts are too idiosyncratic to mesh much. And although the cover of Music for the World’s Africa on the Move boasts artists from Nigeria, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and Senegal, peruse label-owner Bob Haddad’s notes after you’ve paid for 45 minutes of strangely directionless music and learn that three of them now reside in the U.S., news that explains the album’s title, concept, and failure. Listen to the instrumental disc put together by world-clothing honcho Dan Storper, the man behind Rhino’s two Putamayo Presents The Best of World Music releases, and think evil thoughts about “tolerance” as theft: this is world music as flaccid new-age relaxathon, white folkies exploiting nonwhite instruments and techniques in the service of unthreateningly exotic aural wallpaper.

” — Robert Christgau, African compilation roundup for Details, c. 1993

[video]

Jul 07

jackvanzet:

Jack Vanzet

jackvanzet:

Jack Vanzet

(via micaeyes)

(Source: oxym-oron, via hallchristopher)

bagnostian:

"nothing special that i want to say, i just came to pass the time of day"
midtown, nyc.
(Fuji X-Pro1)

bagnostian:

"nothing special that i want to say, i just came to pass the time of day"

midtown, nyc.

(Fuji X-Pro1)

[video]