The Discography

Apr 07

The performance of poptimism -

airgordon:

For the last few days I’ve been unable* to escape the heated discussion about an op-ed that appeared in the New York Times about poptimism, and why it’s bad. Whatever salient points the author may have had are obscured by a bunch of easily deflated arguments, so I won’t go into it. But there’s…

Read to end. (FWIW, Vince Lawrence, who actually was ushering at Comiskey Park the day of the Demolition Derby, is pretty definite that the crowd was mostly racists from the north side.) 

“Silicon Valley is a meritocracy in the same way that the Ivy League schools are: it helps to be smart, but it helps just as much or more to have the right connections. The game is rigged. The pathology of Silicon Valley is that the winners have so much ego invested in pretending that it isn’t. It’s hard for people who pride themselves on their exceptional smartness to acknowledge the fact that they are much luckier than they are smart.” — Rachel Chalmers (via katherinestasaph)

[video]

Apr 06

aubreylstallard:

Paul Jenkins

aubreylstallard:

Paul Jenkins

(Source: aestheticgoddess, via asiswas)

Apr 03

[video]

terrysdiary:

The Furby Jacket.

terrysdiary:

The Furby Jacket.

Apr 02

prettycolors:

#f40b64

prettycolors:

#f40b64

jthenr-comics-vault:

Dark Figure Of The Night

jthenr-comics-vault:

Dark Figure Of The Night

Jeff Mills: [In the Sixties and Seventies, science fiction] was everywhere. NASA was active at that time. There had been a few really successful movies like 2001. It was an industry that was very much embedded into the American psyche, or already ingrained.”

RA: Do you think all that sci-fi stuff had an element of escapism that was particularly appealing to the situation of growing up in Detroit?

Mills: I think it was pretty much all over the country. I found an encyclopedia of science fiction writers from pulp fiction all the way to comics. [It said] where the people were from. If you look at that you see that it was very much in the Midwest, a few on the West Coast, of course—in San Francisco, northern California. Many in New Jersey, many in New York; some in Boston; and a few spread out in other places. Some were women disguising themselves as men so they could get their stories published. America has a very interesting background for fantasy/science fiction writing. These weren’t their primary jobs. They were accountants; they were waitresses; they were people from all sectors of the workforce. They had the opportunity to write these stories because this is what they felt they were contributing to in terms of the future, I suppose. This has been going on for quite some time. If you go back and look at the history of science fiction writing, it’s been a hundred years of constant accumulation of writings about and projections about the future and space and humans’ relationship to it. By the Sixties and Seventies it had really been manifesting in Americans. Most of these magazines and periodicals were read while people were catching the train, or in transit in cities—big hubs like Chicago had a large amount of readers. Detroit also was a big hub for trains and that type of rail travel. Those places had the most active readers, which could explain why comics are so popular in Chicago. There’s a very strong connection between this genre and our American societies.

” — RA Exchange: EX.192 Jeff Mills (Resident Advisor)

(Source: theundergroundismassive)

Apr 01

theundergroundismassive:

R.I.P. Frankie Knuckles, for Rolling Stone.

theundergroundismassive:

R.I.P. Frankie Knuckles, for Rolling Stone.